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  • Kimberly A. Kralowec
    The Kralowec Law Group
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    Web: www.kraloweclaw.com
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Saturday, October 13, 2007

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Comments

Greg May

Kimberly,

You're certianly right that lawyers who practice in a certain area are the ones that should write about it. I think Judge Hawkins was probably addressing lawyers falling somewhere in between the two examples you gave.

For example, since your "about" page describes you as a "plaintiffs' class action lawyer," I think Judge Hawkins would assume that your analysis is biased (whether it is or not) in favor of plaintiffs in UCL cases generally (though he wouldn't have to "dig down" very deep to find what you do). Likewise, some of the substantive law blogs, such as many of the ones put up by personal injury attorneys or employment attorneys who nearly or always represent one side of such disputes, would probably be presumed by Judge Hawkins to be written in less than objective fashion.

I suggest the ones he has to "dig down" to find are those who practice in a certain area of law who might be contemplating litigation or are in the early stages of it with issues similar to the one they are blogging about. They won't blog about their own case, but they will blog about issues that might influence their case. Again, this is easier for a lawyer who always represents the same side in a dispute (employers in employment cases, or criminal defense lawyers, e.g.).

Just my suspicion as to what Judge Hawkins was thinking.

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